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Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation :: View topic - Norfolk Island parakeet disaster
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Norfolk Island parakeet disaster

 
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Peter
Foundation Member
Foundation Member


Joined: Oct 15, 2004
Posts: 599

PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 3:16 am    Post subject: Norfolk Island parakeet disaster

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23035685-5013404,00.html

PARROT experts say an aviary breeding program intended to save one of Australia's rarest birds has ended in disaster, with the Norfolk Island parakeet teetering on the brink of extinction.

Some of the last surviving parakeets died after being caught for breeding in aviaries on Norfolk Island. While authorities claim the program was successful and that the wild parakeet population had ballooned to more than 200, experts believe the real figure could be fewer than 20.

The Norfolk Island parakeet is found only on the small Pacific island, an Australian territory.

A National Parks and Wildlife Service captive breeding program began in the 1980s after surveys put the population at between 16 and 30.

The plan was to hatch and raise young birds for release back into the wild, but no parakeets have been released. At the same time, at least 11 captive birds have died.

Leading parrot expert Joe Forshaw, who initiated the program but is now retired, said he was dismayed at its failure.

"They had no qualified aviculturalists working with this and that's why it's a disaster." Dr Forshaw said that during a visit to the island last month, he conducted surveys for wild parrots. "I believe there are fewer birds now than in a 1978 census that we did," he said.

"There are supposed to be more than 200 but there is nothing to support that. The surveys have not been done." Dr Forshaw said the nestlings of some of the few surviving wild birds were suffering from a potentially fatal beak and feather disease.

Several of the birds that died in captivity were examined by New Zealand veterinarian Bryan Gartrell.

Dr Gartrell said he could not comment on the parakeet deaths because of professional obligations. However, he said parrots caught in the wild often died of diseases arising from bacterial and viral infections, and an incorrect diet was often a key factor.

Norfolk Island National Park manager Brooke Watson admitted an official wild parakeet population estimate of between 200 and 250 was not based on surveys.

"Maybe there are only 20 or 30 but we believe it is more," Mr Watson said.

Six parakeets remain in captivity in the island's Botanic Gardens, where their aviary is often visited by wild birds. Mr Watson said the park's service was talking to Sydney's Taronga Zoo about the prospects of reviving the program.
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Steptoe
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Oct 06, 2004
Posts: 4458

PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 7:06 am    Post subject:

Now why am I not surprised??
Very similar things happened here in NZ with the rare Orange kakariki..

Again...
Quote:
"They had no qualified aviculturalists working with this and that's why it's a disaster." Dr Forshaw said


Bureaucracy protecting its own hierarchy before the protect of the birds
All though private breeders in NZ where not meant to be involved in the Orange program, 'unofficial covert consultation' with private breeders by genuine grass roots Gov ppl with a genuine interest in conservation did take place AFTER very similar disasters took place early in the Orange program. (Covered in threads elsewhere in these forums) Even now I do not believe the program or wild releases is successful as could be simply because these genuine ppl are being over ruled by (mis) management

Quote:
Several of the birds that died in captivity were examined by New Zealand veterinarian Bryan Gartrell. (Admin: Name Correction Bret ..a man of international reputation, experience and integrity. at Massey University Also has done consultation for this web site )

Dr Gartrell said he could not comment on the parakeet deaths because of professional obligations. However, he said parrots caught in the wild often died of diseases arising from bacterial and viral infections, and an incorrect diet was often a key factor.

Another common factor is a politically correct design of breeding aviaries which is meant to reduce stress, but creates stress and deaths.

Private breeders interested in conservation have been wall for decades over the bloody stupidity of bureaucratic protection of their own hyachry...and they often blame it on budgets.or cover ups....its BS at its bureaucratic worst.

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spinninglady
New Member
New Member


Joined: Aug 17, 2008
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 8:58 pm    Post subject:

It's so sad that the folks who should be saving the planet! Are so bound up in "petty power politics" they loose sight of the goal!!!

We are ALL trying to save our native birds & habitat but because some of us are volunteers we are dismissed as "no brainers" because we are daft enough to work for nothing!!

Keep on trying folks the birds need us....we will be planting bird feeder plants arou
dunond our local "queens chain" next weekend.javascript:emoticon('duno')
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