Welcome to Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Diet, Health, Aviaries and Conservation!
Ask Questions, Find Answers and DiscussionsKakariki Member Pics, Mutation/Species IdentificationInformation on Permits, Research Papers etcLinks to Other Sites and InformationYour A/C Details, Messages

     GT Modules
· Home
· Forums
· Email Webmaster
Email Webmaster for any problems with Registering, the site and General Enquires
·Link to Us, Details
Set to your default home page· Set Home page


       QuickSearch
Search Forums
for key Words
Advanced Search
 Search  Words

     NZ Conservation Projects


DoC / NZ Conservation Sites


Karori Wildlife Sanctuary Wellington, NZ
Kiwi House and Native Bird Park
New Zealand Conservation Management Group
The National Wildlife Centre
MOTUIHE PROJECT


Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Diet, Health, Aviaries and Conservation: Forums

Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation :: View topic - Kakariki sexing and mutation identification
 Forum FAQForum FAQ    SearchSearch     Log inLog in/Register  

Kakariki sexing and mutation identification

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation Forum Index -> Kakariki Mutations and Species
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Dow
New Member
New Member


Joined: Jan 02, 2011
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:39 am    Post subject: Kakariki sexing and mutation identification

I'm sorry you must get questions about this all the time, but I'm really curious about the birds I've bought recently. I have 3 birds - one green which I think is a female ("Jade"), and two yellows which I think are male and female ("Corfai" and "Teeda"). See the photos here http://www.flickr.com/photos/55575164@N05/

I'm guessing their sex by their beaks alone but although Jade has a slender beak, she seems quite big and her tail looks a lot broader than Teeda's so I'm not sure.

My second question is about my yellows. I bought them thinking they were lutinos but have since done some reading and have discovered they're not because they both have black eyes. The dark patch on the male's rump and his eye streak I had thought were some kind of health problem but it seems it's because it's a pied. The male is a slightly less vivid banana yellow than the female and his crown is not as full and deep red. The thing I most want to know is why are the female's claws white while the male's are white apart from one on each foot which is black?

Are they black eyed clears or gold checks? I don't understand the difference if there is one. Could someone knowledgeable please explain this and verify the sex of my birds?

Thanks!
Back to top
wyndara
Snr Member
Snr Member


Joined: Jun 19, 2005
Posts: 113

PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 2:05 pm    Post subject:

Dow, In my hummble opinion all three birds look like hens . The green bird is a cinnamon, the two yellows are black eyed clears- the name we seem to use here in Aus. Birds are very hard to sex from photos. cheers
Back to top
Steptoe
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Oct 06, 2004
Posts: 4550

PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:59 pm    Post subject:

The wild im not sure, I would say a male...we have a breeding male, thu a tellow crown that has a thin long beak like that...
The others I would hazzard a gess at males...again due to the length rather than width of the beaks.
This one definately male thu
http://www.flickr.com/photos/55575164@N05/5311835595/in/photostream/
Going from the consistancy of the beak shapes I would also gess they are related maybe???

Mutations, I have no experiance and not qualified to comment.

_________________
My Spelling is Not Incorrect...It's 'Creative'
Back to top
pabloc
Foundation Member
Foundation Member


Joined: Sep 26, 2007
Posts: 988

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 8:50 am    Post subject:

Hi buddies,

Dow, I also had the same questions when I started keeping kakariki as many 'goldchecks' have a green feather here or there (I have even bred a goldcheck with a generous green patch in the back). Or as you say a darker toe or toenail. And then I found this forum and found answers to my questions.

I'm a bit wary of using the terms BEC or DEC to define a pied bird, as DEC or BEC is a standalone mutation consisting of a 95% eumelanin reduction, allelic of (Non-Sex-Linked) NSL ino.
A mutation of its own right.

Goldcheck is the name given to recessive pied kakarikis with a completely (or almost) yellow plumage and black eyes, without visible iris.
If it has red eyes then it's probably a combination of goldcheck + fallow.

Quote:
The male is a slightly less vivid banana yellow than the female and his crown is not as full and deep red.

The depth of the yellow color I think could be probably due to selection. Some birds have a more intense yellow color, due to the psittacine pigment.

In kakariki I haven't paid enough attention to it, but in cockatiels, especially pearl and edged, I try to select and breed birds with a more intense yellow. Also lutino.
I find them more attractive than birds with a whiter background. They are like more colorful. The mask and cheeks are usually more intense also.

I think with kakariki it's probably the same, as the background color is yellow and the crown and cheekpatches are red, 2 colors directly dependant on the quality of psittacine.



I wousay the birds in that picture could be the same sex, but I can't tell male or fem.. The bird on the right hand has more hybrid traces, and it could also be slightly smaller because of that.
The cinnamon kakariki I think is a male.

I would not use the hybrid kakariki to breed, the other 2 seem a lot better and in case of needing a bird of different sex I'm sure you can find a quality kakariki through someone here in the forum.

Do you keep any other species?

Welcome to the forum and good luck!

Cheers / Pablo

_________________
AD ASTRA PER ASPERA

http://kakariki2009.skyrock.com/
http://cyanoramphus.weebly.com/index.html
Back to top
Dow
New Member
New Member


Joined: Jan 02, 2011
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 2:42 pm    Post subject:

Thanks for your replies. I thought the yellows were different sexes because one is noticeably smaller and slimmer and "daintier". The other is more thickset and chunky. You can't really see the difference in size in the pictures but it's noticeable in the aviary. But I'll take your word for it!

I was interested in the comment about "hybrid characteristics". What characteristics are these?

I'm not looking to breed them at the moment but if I were to breed them I'd definitely use the yellow bird on the left which has beautiful colour and feather texture, with no green spots at all.

My cinnamon looks a bit sick today. I think it's a case of diarrhoea from eating too much jasmine (addiction problem!)
Back to top
pabloc
Foundation Member
Foundation Member


Joined: Sep 26, 2007
Posts: 988

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 2:59 pm    Post subject:

Hi Dow,

we have 2 species of kakariki in aviculture:
- Red fronted (cyanoramphus novazelandiae)
- Yellow fronted (cyanoramphus auriceps)

Due to lack of knowledge and rigor in some cases, and greed (money, mutations, etc...) in others, both species have been cross-bred.
The consequence is that although there are birds in the market that do not fulfill the characteristics of neither of the species.

Yellow are smaller, have a red frontal band with a yellow crown on top, and they don't have the eyepatches.
Red fronts are bigger, the whole crown and front are red, with red eyepatches behind the eye.
The iris color is also different, being a darker red in red fronts, and rather orange in yellow fronts.

Birds with mixed yellow and red in the crown, faded eyepatches, etc... are hybrids. There are also marginal hybrids with a tinge of yellow around the edges of the crown.
I'm talking about red fronts.
(I don't keep yellow fronts myself).

The situation is a bit the same with eye-ring lovebirds, the difference at least in Europe is that there have been imports until recently so it's still possible to find pure strains of lovebirds.
Last kakariki batches imported into Europe I think have been before 1955 or so.

You are very right on paying attention to feather structure, color, etc... every detail counts.

Hope this helps!

Cheers / Pablo

PS: You can see pics here in the website's gallery: http://www.kakariki.net/modules.php?name=gallery

_________________
AD ASTRA PER ASPERA

http://kakariki2009.skyrock.com/
http://cyanoramphus.weebly.com/index.html
Back to top
Dow
New Member
New Member


Joined: Jan 02, 2011
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:45 pm    Post subject:

I don't like the sound of that. I'll have it put down straight away! Thanks for the warning...
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation Forum Index -> Kakariki Mutations and Species All times are GMT + 13 Hours
Page 1 of 1
Copy Paste Text Here to Translate
Select Language and Translate

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by PHPBulletinBoard © 2001-2008 phpBulletinBoard Group
PHPBulletinBoard port based on Tom Nitzschner's PHPBulletinBoard upgraded to PHPBulletinBoard 2.0.7
Standalone Developed Tested by: ChatServ, mikem,
and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

by Nuke Cops 2004




All Logos and Trademarks in this site are Property of their Respective Owners.
Statements and Views Expressed on this web site Represent the Opinions of the Authors.
Neither this Site or the Publishers of this Site Assume Any Liability for the Information Contained Herein.
ANY CONTENT from this Site can only be DISTRIBUTED/PUBLISHED/USED ELSEWHERE with PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION
ALL COMMENTS/PICTURES/CONTENT are the PROPERTY of the CONTRIBUTORS and 2004/2015 by WWW.KAKARIKI.NET

Web site engine's code is Copyright © 2003 by NukePortal. All Rights Reserved. NukePortal is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.
Page Generation: 0.433 Seconds